Loewe’s first North American store is befitting of its Irish designer-cum-creative-director Jonathan Anderson—classic with a contemporary edge. The boutique, large and luminous, is also supremely nostalgic, as one can instantly tell from the massive 18th-century granary at the center of the space. The hórreo, as it’s called in Spanish, was retrieved from a town bordering northern Spain (Galicia) and Portugal and brought to the boutique as a symbol of Loewe’s cultural fluidity: Past and present, Europe and North America, existing harmoniously in the upscale Miami Design District.

“Let’s Rock,” an exhibition at Fahey/Klein Gallery, reveals a compelling survey of works by some of the most prolific photographers.  Shaping the identity of Rock & Roll as a social and cultural revolution, photography has been complicit in perpetuating music and its protagonists to legendary status. In a 2009 exhibit, the Brooklyn Museum of Art canonized the genre in “Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History 1960 – Present.” Now with 38 works of its own on view, Fahey/Klein brings rock’s pivotal moments to the Miami Design District.

Transforming luxury boutiques into speakeasies, and galleries into soapboxes and stages, Site-Specific is a unique and ephemeral exploration of the Design District. The performance-based series offers a fast-paced platform for any combination of genres in dance, music, theatre and poetry where guests are invited to a series of events taking place in locations all throughout the neighborhood. From de la Cruz Collection Contemporary Art Space and Theory boutique, to the former showroom of Cartier jewelers and still-new Palm Court, Site-Specific returns this Saturday with a parcour of events throughout Miami Design District.

Brooklyn-based sculptor Ruby Sky Stiler’s stunning solo show opens at Locust Projects in the Miami Design District on Saturday, February 28. Miami, with its rapid development and old Florida charm, will identify and appreciate her juxtaposition of functional design and decorative superficies. New pieces that explore the tropical modernist architecture native to Miami come to life in this exhibit, as do previous works more closely related to the artist's ongoing investigation of the female figure.

Over the years, Miami has, for better or worse, become known for its murals.  Some of the most compelling are those that reference or interact with the immediate environment – they somehow contextualize or make better sense of their surroundings.  “Vortex” in the Miami Design District is a perfect example.  The first time I experienced it was with the remnants of construction and a thin layer of dust floating around purple LED lamps: a perfectly and sufficiently hazy setting for an enormous vortex mural.

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