Yuri Tuma offers audiences a point of “Departure,” a large-scale chromatic photography exhibition at Butter Gallery. With symmetry, patterns, and his signature use of mobile technology, Tuma reshapes the seemingly ordinary into ephemeral visual representations. His exploration of materiality, motion, and color are at times mesmerizing and, for the artist, represent an elevated inner sanctum. This meditative space of quiet and mental centering is where Tuma creates these works. His oeuvre, through clean shapes and simple lines, channel this transformative physical and psychological process.

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In 2011, collector Craig Robins acquired the 24-foot prototype Fly’s Eye Dome with the intention of exhibiting it and using it as inspiration for a key element of the Miami Design District. The following year, The Buckminster Fuller Institute (BFI), in partnership with Goetz Composites, ConformLab and DRDesign, and a team of advisors began the development of a program to complete Fuller’s vision for the Fly’s Eye Dome using utilizing advanced technologies and materials not available to Fuller in the 1970’s.  Robins, through his company Dacra, commissioned BFI to produce a Fly’s Eye Dome utilizing state-of-the-art materials, intelligence and techniques, to be prominently incorporated into a significant public plaza in the Miami Design District.

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In a beaming 3,200 square-foot corner of the Miami Design District, artist Paula Crown has plans for TRANSPOSITION: Over Many Miles - an interactive sculpture engaging the surrounding community and mixed-use neighborhood.  Her work channels Robert Smithson’s Earthworks and the ideas behind Rosalind Krauss’ essay on sculpture, Expanded Field, in a vision to integrate and manifest the  relationship between art and the environment in which it is created.

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Locust Projects will produce a major new installation by New York-based artist Daniel Arsham in his hometown of Miami.  For the installation, entitled Welcome to the Future, Arsham transforms the gallery into an excavation site, digging a trench in the gallery’s floor that holds thousands of calcified artifacts—a muted cacophony of 20th century media devices. Mounds of boom boxes, electric guitars, SLR cameras, Blackberries, Nintendo controllers, VHS tapes, Walkmans, film projectors, and portable televisions, rendered in crystal, volcanic ash, and other minerals fill the pit, collapsing linear narratives of past, present, and future. The trench presents the recent past as archeology, a world of technological objects whose obsolescence was built into their design, preserved like petrified wood or the figures of Pompeii. Arsham presents these devices as a mass below our feet, in a grand gesture that rewrites narratives of production, history, and discovery.

We think Johnny Robles is all grown up. “Let It Slide,” his inaugural gallery solo exhibition, is presently on view at Spinello Projects – and this, on the heels of a major show at the Art & Culture Center of Hollywood. 

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